episode 1
" The Journeyman – Technical Expertise to Management Capability "
German journeymen in traditional uniform during journeyman years
During the 17th Century or (early modern period of Europe), the Journeyman was a person who had gained the craft knowledge and skills comparable with today's Tradesperson. Although the process of acquiring those trade skills today is vastly different to what it was then in terms of industry, technology, information and application (to name but a few), the essence of gaining a trade qualification and the technical experience that followed, is essentially the same now as it was back then!

The term Journeyman referred to the journey or travels that a qualified tradesperson would embark upon to gain the experience necessary to build on the skills that they had acquired under the guidance of a Master Journeyman. These days, when you consider how organisations typically transition technically capable people (individual contributors) who have demonstrated the ability to collaborate and handle additional responsibilities, into a first-level management position that is, moving from 'managing one's self' to managing others', it is tempting to compare the 'individual contributor' to 'manager' transition, with the origins of the Master Journeyman.
German journeymen in traditional uniform during journeyman years
During the 17th Century or (early modern period of Europe), the Journeyman was a person who had gained the craft knowledge and skills comparable with today's Tradesperson. Although the process of acquiring those trade skills today is vastly different to what it was then in terms of industry, technology, information and application (to name but a few), the essence of gaining a trade qualification and the technical experience that followed, is essentially the same now as it was back then!

The term Journeyman referred to the journey or travels that a qualified tradesperson would embark upon to gain the experience necessary to build on the skills that they had acquired under the guidance of a Master Journeyman. These days, when you consider how organisations typically transition technically capable people (individual contributors) who have demonstrated the ability to collaborate and handle additional responsibilities, into a first-level management position that is, moving from 'managing one's self' to managing others', it is tempting to compare the 'individual contributor' to 'manager' transition, with the origins of the Master Journeyman.
A master discusses a vacuum compressor with his apprentice boy and several other craftsmen
Have modern organisations moved away from using technical competence as the key determinant for promotion to the first level of management?

The necessity for organisations to be more agile, lean and adaptive to the speed and competitiveness of changing markets, means that first-level Managers face immediate challenges in engaging and empowering employees to drive business forward in ways that may not have been necessary previously. This requires a different skill set from today's Managers that extends beyond the scope of technical competence. First-level Managers need to re-allocate their time so that they not only complete their own assigned work but also help others to perform more effectively.

They must shift from just getting the work done themselves to getting the work done through others and valuing managerial work rather than just tolerating, which is an important understanding at this point (Charan, Drotter and Noel, 2011, p. 16-18).

It is plausible that organisations who continue to promote people into first-level management roles based on the technical competence determinant, without considering whether that individual has the desire and willingness to change their value set, and apply the skills needed to manage, lead and influence positive performance through others, will struggle to achieve the agility and adaptiveness required for them to perform effectively.
Q1
What values and behaviours do you think the modern First-level Manager should develop as they step into the first turn of the Leadership Pipeline and operate effectively at this first level?
Q2
How do you think Coaching could help First-level Managers cope with the variety of challenges they will face and is it feasible to consider an 'Apprenticed Manager' approach towards development?
Stemmer, A. https://commons.wikimedia.org, Charan, R. Drotter, S and Noel, J. (2011), The Leadership Pipeline, How to build the Leadership Powered Company,
2nd edn. Jossey-Bass
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